Employee Introduction to Fleet Management

Employee Introduction to Fleet Management

We have developed this guide to help you introduce GPS Fleet Management to your employees and answer their questions up front. By communicating with employees directly and outlining how they and the company will benefit, you can help make the transition much smoother. Experience has shown that “good” employees have no problem with accountability. In fact, a good employee welcomes it as accountability sets them apart from a less productive co-worker. The employee who resists fleet monitoring is more than likely an employee who could use improvement. Some employees might also have a tendency to distrust or at least be skeptical of change. Their resistance is very likely rooted in unrealistic attitudes toward change. Change is a continuous part of every successful business. A good relationship with your drivers will help your fleet run more smoothly and efficiently. The more you can get your drivers to embrace the change instead of resisting it, the better off everyone will be. In short, just be honest and forthright from the beginning and you will gain employee trust. Employee Introduction to Fleet Management: The following five steps have proven to be highly effective in helping employees collaborate with change.

  • Make it easy for drivers to clearly identify and understand the change.
  • Help drivers realize that their first reaction could be rooted in assumptions, not facts.
  • Clarify both your and the driver’s interests when considering new policies.
  • Brainstorm ways to satisfy both your and their interests.
  • Seek mutually acceptable solutions.

Employee Introduction to Fleet Management: Pointers
It’s no secret why you purchased “GPS Fleet Management” – to increase driver efficiency, improve route management, increase time savings and have the ability to account for your fleet’s progress. How do you communicate those things to your employee? How do you get them to see that your new system will also benefit them? We’ve put together the following talking points to help you introduce the system to your employees. We suggest breaking down your presentation into four main points:
I. Introduction
Inform your employees that your company, in keeping with current technologies, will be instituting a new fleet management system. This technology will allow your company to remain competitive in today’s faster business environment, result in increased efficiency and will have a positive impact on your company’s bottom line. Also, share with employees some of the benefits other companies have enjoyed with the system.
II. System Explanation
Explain how the system actually works. Describe the units in the vehicles, the computer interface, and the activities the system will record.
III. System Benefits
Provide an overview of the benefits the system will provide – from decreased insurance premiums to increased route management – but also discuss, in detail, the direct benefits to employees.
IV. Questions and Answers
Open the floor to questions. If someone asks a question that you aren’t able to answer right away, tell them you’ll find the answer and get back to them and do just that. As an example, this might be a way a company would introduce the system to its employees: Thank you all for joining me today. I know we all have a lot on our plates right now and time is in short supply around here. But I think you’ll find this meeting a productive one. I wanted to talk to you today about the new fleet management system we’ll be introducing in the next couple of weeks. In order to remain competitive and to prosper in today’s hi-tech world, it is essential to be aware of trends and to stay abreast with current technologies. Electronic fleet management is revolutionizing the way fleets are managed in America today. We have made an investment in this system because it will ultimately help us be more efficient and hopefully have a positive impact on our bottom line.
Do’s and Don’ts
There is no magic formula for introducing a “GPS Fleet Management” system to your employees. However, our experience has identified a number of “Do’s and Don’ts” to follow:
DO:
Try to introduce the system in a group meeting or other personal communication. By calling a personal meeting (or a series of small group meetings, depending on the size of your organization), you’ll give employees the opportunity to learn about the system first-hand rather than through the grapevine. It also allows employees to have all of their questions answered from top management.
Keep the meetings and correspondence upbeat and positive. You may be installing the system because work isn’t up to par, but communicating this to your drivers will automatically put the system in a negative light. Talk about things you feel the company will be able to improve because of the new system, and be sure to include the positive benefits for employees.
Establish a way for employees to provide feedback and have their questions answered after the system is in place. Encourage e-mails or memos or create a comment box through which employees’ concerns and suggestions can be heard.
Recognize all positive changes and improvements you see once the system is up and running. Whether it’s a gift certificate or cash bonus or simply a letter from the company president, be sure to recognize and reward desired behavior. This will clearly demonstrate to employees that the system provides benefits to both the company and the individual drivers.
DON’T:
Install the system before informing your employees. You may be tempted to install the units without employee knowledge simply to track work or establish a benchmark by which to determine the system’s success. However, the problem of potential employee backlash usually is not worth it. If employees know about and understand the system from the start, efficiency starts rising from day one. Moreover, being open and honest builds trust with even the most critical employees.
Hide information about the system or evade tough questions. It’s important that employees understand the system and what it’s monitoring in order to get the results you are seeking.
Expect all employees to immediately embrace the system. It’s human nature to react to workplace changes with some uneasiness and distrust, and you may never win everyone over. But once employees understand what the system is designed to do, and start to see increased efficiency and time savings throughout the fleet, most will accept it and work to improve their performance. It’s been our experience that good workers are the ones you want to keep long term, and they welcome the system as it recognizes their strengths and reinforces their contributions to the company.
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